How to Be More Involved in Your Child’s Education

*This is a collaborative post*


Research has found that when parents get more involved in their child’s education, the child tends to perform better. This is likely because they feel more inclined to try harder, so that they impress their parents and avoid disappointing them. What’s more, if they feel that they have parental sort, they may feel more confident taking risks and stepping outside of their comfort zone. With that said, it would be wise for you to find ways to show your child that you are committed to their education and helping them do well. Here are some tips from an international school in North London.



Talk About School with Your Child


At the end of each day, find time to have a chat with your child about what happened at school to show them that you care. It doesn’t have to be a long conversation, just a brief catchup to let them know that you care and are there for them should they need some support. Be sure to ask open-ended questions that require more than a one-word answer, otherwise it will feel like a one-sided conversation. Here are some examples of questions you could ask:


  • What lessons did you have today? Which one was your favourite? Why?

  • Who did you sit next to in English/Science/History? What are they like?

  • Who is your favourite teacher? Why?

  • What did you learn about in Maths/Geography/Music?

  • How did you spend your lunch break?

  • What homework do you have this evening?


Communicate with Teachers


Keeping in regular contact with your child’s teachers will not only allow you to stay up to date with their progress but will also show your child that you are genuinely interested in their progress. At the start of term, have a chat with your child’s teachers and find out how they would like to communicate with you, i.e., via email, phone call, or a face-to-face meeting. Of course, you should also attend Parents’ Evening so that you can find out how your child is performing and whether or not they need any extra help. 


Attend Events


If your child is performing in the school play or taking part in sports day, or any other events at school, try and attend if possible. You could even offer to chaperone on school trips or help out with other extra-curricular activities. Getting involved with events at the school will help your child see how much you prioritise their pursuits, both academic and otherwise.